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Reminder: 14th Edition AISC Steel Construction Manual Arrives Tomorrow
Posted by Tasha Weiss on June 30, 2011 at 9:04 AM.

manual-14th_ed1.jpg

Available Friday, July 1, this new burgundy publication (reminiscent of the 6th Edition Manual) contains, and is based on, ANSI/AISC 360-10, the 2010 AISC Specification for Structural Steel Buildings. Located in Part 16 of the Manual, the Specification is the standard that is referenced by building codes and job specifications. This document is the heart and soul of the information and recommendations provided in all the rest of the Manual, even though it may seem relegated to one of the last chapters.

 

AISC is aware of the difficulty experienced by the structural engineering profession when dealing with frequent changes in building codes and material standards. For this reason, the revisions made in this version of the Manual were limited to clarifications and a minimal number of technical changes. The Manual includes the following notable updates and revisions:

  • All tabular information and discussions have been updated to comply with the 2010 Specification for Structural Steel Buildings, and the standards and other documents referenced therein.
  • Shape information has been updated to ASTM A6-09, including the addition of two new shape series, HP18 and HP16.
  • Weights of HSS are revised based on industry practice.
  • The minimum Sz value for single angles is published based on the heel and toes of the angles.
  • Tables for eccentrically loaded single angles are revised to be consistent with the Specification using the unsymmetric shape equations in Specification Section H2.
  • Available compressive strength tables for filled HSS now indicate at what length the bare steel member controls the strength.
  • The coefficients, C, in the eccentrically loaded weld group tables have been revised for the a=0 case (no eccentricity) to be consistent with Specification Chapter J. Additionally, the tables are supplemented to provide the strength for L-shaped welds loaded from either side.
  • The procedure for the design of conventional single-plate shear connections is revised to accommodate the increased bolt shear strengths of the 2010 Specification for Structural Steel Buildings.
  • Information is provided to determine if stiffening plates (stabilizers) are required for extended single-plate shear connections.
  • The bracket plate design procedure is revised.

 

A full day seminar on the new Specification and Manual will kick off in mid-September and will be presented in cities throughout the United States. This will be the inaugural Louis F. Geschwindner Seminar Series entitled, Leverage Your Knowledge With the 2010 AISC Specification and the 14th Edition Steel Construction Manual. The important changes and clarifications that have been incorporated into the 2010 AISC Specification and the 14th Edition Steel Construction Manual will be explained in this seminar, including design examples illustrating the provisions and use of these publications. The new annual seminar series has been named to honor AISC’s immediate past Vice President of Engineering and Research, and to emphasize the importance AISC places on providing valuable continuing education programs to the steel design and construction community.

 

The Manual will be available for purchase on the AISC website at www.aisc.org/store for $175 (members) and $350 (nonmembers). The accompanying Version 14.0 database and design examples will be provided on the AISC website later this summer at www.aisc.org/shapesdatabase and www.aisc.org/designexamples.

 

—Cynthia J. Duncan, director of engineering, AISC


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New Version of Tekla BIMsight Available
Posted by Tasha Weiss on June 29, 2011 at 10:05 AM.

tekla-bimsight-1-2-ui-web.jpgTekla BIMsight 1.2 is now available for construction collaboration. It offers new features including redlining in 3D, model management and grouping, interactive model relocating, document linking and notes management. This version of the product is also easier to use, for example, by enabling area selection and adding visibility controls. Download and share it for free on Tekla’s website here.

 

Have you modeled and built a structure using Tekla BIM software?

Remember to enter the Tekla North America BIM Awards 2011 by this Friday, July 1 and show your project success in a 3D model. For more information about the awards and to enter your model, go to the competition website here.

 

The awards consist of three categories: BIM projects, Steel projects, and Concrete projects. One prize is awarded to each category and each participant can enter one model per category.

 

Winners receive:

  • Tekla North America BIM Awards 2011 Trophy
  • Tekla website and advertisement publicity
  • One (1) Tekla Structures Viewer license
  • Two (2) tickets to Tekla North American User Meeting 2012


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Free Live Webinar on Using iPads for Construction Quality
Posted by Tasha Weiss on June 28, 2011 at 8:29 AM.

iPads aren’t just a hot new consumer tablet; they’re also being used as a valuable business tool in the construction industry. Learn from CM firm Shiel Sexton and owner Dow AgroSciences about how they’ve used Vela Systems field management software on iPads to improve quality and safety programs at the project and company level in today’s free live webinar from 1 p.m. - 2 p.m. Eastern Time. Register for the webinar on Vela Systems’ website here.

 

Featured Webinar Speakers:
Tim Isle, GM - Science & Technology, Shiel Sexton
Joe Brown, Safety & Quality Director, Shiel Sexton
Tom Lingafelter, Program Manager, Dow AgroSciences

 

The webinar will be followed by a Q&A session with the presenters and registered attendees will receive access to a recording of the webinar about 48 hours after the live event. A link to the recording will be sent to the email address used to register.


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Strain Gage Training Videos Available
Posted by Tasha Weiss on June 27, 2011 at 11:34 AM.

Vishay Precision Group, Inc. offers three new training videos demonstrating key procedures that are the basis for using strain gages, at www.micro-measurements.com/videos.

 

Surface Preparation: A strain gage needs to be properly mounted in order to ensure consistent, reliable, and accurate measurement. Strain gages can be bonded to almost any solid material if the material surface is properly prepared. Specific procedures and techniques that will result in strong, stable bonds are demonstrated in the video “Strain Gage Surface Preparation for Steel and Aluminum Alloys.”

 

Bonding: Micro-Measurements’ CEA-Series gages are widely used in general-purpose experimental stress analysis applications. The devices’ large, rugged copper-coated tabs are optimized for attaching leadwires directly to the tabs, eliminating the need for separate terminals. Learn how to bond the strain gages in the video “CEA Strain Gage Installation With M-Bond 200 Adhesive.”

 

Soldering Leadwires: The video “Soldering and Coating a CEA Strain Gage” shows how to attach leadwires to a Micro-Measurements CEA strain gage and apply a coating to the gage to protect it in a laboratory environment.

These topics are also addressed in complete detail in VPG’s training programs. Course descriptions and calendar information can be found at www.vishaypg.com/micro-measurements/trai
ning-programs
.


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Steel Shots: Steel and Green(ery)
Posted by Geoff Weisenberger on June 24, 2011 at 1:13 PM.

2011-05-08_11-05-21_755-500p.jpg

The Garfield Park Conservatory in Chicago is one of the largest in the United States. (Click on photo for another, closer view.)

 

Not long ago, I visited the Garfield Park Conservatory on Chicago’s West Side. It wasn’t my first visit; I’ve been many times. I’ve also paid multiple visits to the Lincoln Park Conservatory, a few miles away on Chicago’s lakefront, as well as several other nature conservatories throughout the country. I love conservatories. Any time of year, you can wander into one and temporarily feel like you’re in the middle of a tropical rainforest—which is particularly nice during the frigid Chicago winters. Snow and below-freezing temperatures outside? No problem, just step on in and you’re whisked away to Borneo.

 

Whether it’s one of these two Chicago conservatories or any other, there’s no denying that they all have a similar look and feel, which is clearly tied to their functionality—lots of glass, thin framing for the glass and little else, so as to let in as much sunlight as possible. And that framing is typically iron or steel. We frequently tout how steel is great for projects that want to maximize daylighting opportunities. Well, no facility type needs more daylighting than a conservatory or greenhouse; steel is ideal for these structures.

 

Given my position as the sustainability go-to person for AISC, I’m bombarded with green marketing and messages from every arm of the construction industry and beyond. Seemingly every company incorporates artistic renderings of trees or leaves in their green marketing materials, hoping to convince you that their product is good—or at least isn’t bad—for the environment. In a way, conservatories play a similar role, albeit in three dimensions and high humidity as opposed to pixels or paper, as they provide an in-the-flesh connection between steel and the environment. And when you think about it, each one is basically a case study of steel protecting nature. (Hmm, I like this as a marketing message. . . )

 

At the very least, lush foliage in the foreground, bright skies in the background and elegant steel framing in between make for some pretty pictures.

 


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Mark Trimble Talks SteelDay in Latest AISC Podcast
Posted by Tasha Weiss on June 23, 2011 at 12:08 PM.

podcasts_june_lg.jpgHave you been tuning into AISC’s Steel Profiles podcast series? June’s episode shines the spotlight on this year’s SteelDay coming up on September 23. Tune in to hear the perspective of a SteelDay Host from fabricator Mark Trimble of Huntington Steel. He explains what AISC members can and should do to host a successful SteelDay event and how this national networking and learning celebration creates exciting business opportunities for everybody involved. Listen to it or download it now at www.aisc.org/podcasts.

 

Looking Ahead
A new podcast is released the first Friday of each month, and you won’t want to miss July’s episode featuring an interview with Cindi Duncan, AISC director of engineering. Her discussion about the new 14th Edition AISC Steel Construction Manual will be available on July 1, coinciding with the first day the new Manual will be available. For more information about this new publication’s arrival visit our previous news post, here.

 

Get the Series
By listening to these free monthly interviews you can easily keep up on interesting topics relevant to the steel design and construction industry. They’ve featured discussions with big industry names such as James Fisher, Shankar Nair, Duane Miller, Louis F. Geschwindner, and more. You can play all of the broadcast recordings at www.aisc.org/podcasts or subscribe to them on iTunes at no charge and have them conveniently downloaded for you each month.

 

 


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A Tip from Futurama’s Bender
Posted by Tasha Weiss on June 22, 2011 at 12:00 PM.

compound-bending_web.jpgTurns out we’re not the only ones in the steel industry who are having fun with the new media. Recently Chicago Metal Rolled Products Blog featured a post about Futurama’s Bender Bending Rodriguez (or just Bender). If you’re not familiar with this animated TV character, he’s a robot from the television series Futurama. Kevin the blogger relates he is “highly advanced in bending structural steel (they don’t call him Bender for nothing).” The sketch, he says, shows Bender creating a complex bend which includes a compound bend which blends into a helical bend which blends into an easy way bend at the top with a straight tangent. Read more about what Bender can do in the CMRP blog post here.

 

So why is this important? In this blog post CMRP says that when they’re asked about what the company does, they use Bender as a prime example. Sharing this type of interesting content on the company’s website engages and educates consumers about their products and services in a  way that is accessible and easy for non-technical people to relate to.

 

As social media becomes more prevalent people are obtaining and sharing more information via the Web. Companies like CMRP are also joining the online conversation and providing their own interactive website content as another way to reach customers.

 

Has your company done something clever or have you seen others that have? Drop me an email by clicking on my name above and let me know about it!


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Design Competition for a New St. Petersburg Pier
Posted by Tom Klemens on June 21, 2011 at 9:27 AM.

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A pier has been the centerpiece of the St. Petersburg, Fla. downtown waterfront since its earliest days as a growing fishing village on Florida’s west coast in the late 1800s. The current structure, the seventh in a succession of waterfront piers, opened in 1973 and is nearing the end of its life span. St. Petersburg is sponsoring an international design competition for a new, iconic pier structure to take its place.

 

Interested parties must register for the competition by July 8, 2011. Submission of the Statement of Qualifications will be due on July 19, 2011. A juried panel will select three design teams to be invited to the second phase of the process. During stage two, the three teams will submit a design concept, and each will receive a $50,000 honorarium for participating in the process. It is anticipated that a final plan will be approved and contract negotiations will begin with the accepted team early next year.

 

Design teams interested in obtaining information on the city’s request for qualifications must visit the Competition Web site at www.stpete.org/PierDesign. The Web site also provides volumes of background information and public input generated during a community visioning process that preceded the current design competition.

 

Known as the “inverted pyramid,” the St. Petersburg Pier juts a quarter mile from the city’s downtown entertainment district into Tampa Bay. The current five-story structure includes a rooftop observation platform, restaurants, shops, boating excursions, fishing, bicycle rentals, a Pier Aquarium and more. The current pier replaced the popular “Million Dollar Pier,” (1926 to 1967) which reflected the grand Florida land boom with its Mediterranean-revival casino style building.


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Coming July 1: The 14th Edition AISC Steel Construction Manual
Posted by Tasha Weiss on June 20, 2011 at 9:50 AM.

manual-14th_ed1.jpgAISC’s 14th Edition Steel Construction Manual will be available as a hard copy publication on July 1. We wanted to give you this heads up because once the 14th Edition is available, AISC will no longer ship the 13th Edition Steel Construction Manual. Have you been holding off on ordering the 13th Edition? Don’t wait much longer as all orders for the 13th Edition must be placed before July 1 through AISC’s online bookstore, here.

 

The 14th Edition Manual contains, and is based on, ANSI/AISC 360-10, the 2010 AISC Specification for Structural Steel Buildings. Located in Part 16 of the Manual, the Specification is the standard that is referenced by building codes and job specifications. This document is the heart and soul of the information and recommendations provided in all the rest of the Manual, even though it may seem relegated to one of the last chapters. The Specification is available for free downloading on the AISC website at www.aisc.org/2010spec.

 

AISC is aware of the difficulty experienced by the structural engineering profession when dealing with frequent changes in building codes and material standards. For this reason, the revisions made in this version of the Manual were limited to clarifications and a minimal number of technical changes. The Manual includes the following notable updates and revisions:

 

  • All tabular information and discussions have been updated to comply with the 2010 Specification for Structural Steel Buildings, and the standards and other documents referenced therein.
  • Shape information has been updated to ASTM A6-09, including the addition of two new shape series, HP18 and HP16.
  • Weights of HSS are revised based on industry practice.
  • The minimum Sz value for single angles is published based on the heel and toes of the angles.
  • Tables for eccentrically loaded single angles are revised to be consistent with the Specification using the unsymmetric shape equations in Specification Section H2.
  • Available compressive strength tables for filled HSS now indicate at what length the bare steel member controls the strength.
  • The coefficients, C, in the eccentrically loaded weld group tables have been revised for the a=0 case (no eccentricity) to be consistent with Specification Chapter J. Additionally, the tables are supplemented to provide the strength for L-shaped welds loaded from either side.
  • The procedure for the design of conventional single-plate shear connections is revised to accommodate the increased bolt shear strengths of the 2010 Specification for Structural Steel Buildings.
  • Information is provided to determine if stiffening plates (stabilizers) are required for extended single-plate shear connections.
  • The bracket plate design procedure is revised.

 

The Manual will available for purchase on the AISC website at www.aisc.org/store for $175 (members) and $350 (nonmembers).

 

For more information about the 14th Edition Manual, check out the July issue of MSC, available July 1. (You can find a new issue of MSC available every month on the first of the month at www.modernsteel.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Steel Shots: Rockin’ Ironworkers
Posted by Tom Klemens on June 17, 2011 at 8:56 AM.

old-town-school-of-folk_500.jpg

 

While the crane is getting set, ironworkers get into the spirit of the project by posing on the structural steel for the new building going up at the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago. Photo by Erin English, Old Town School of Folk Music.

 

Isn’t it nice when somebody takes notice of the structural steel? Gail Tyler, administration director of Chicago’s Old Town School of Folk Music, has been blogging regularly since mid-February about the construction of the school’s new building. Her first post appropriately featured the beginning of the steel erection. Toward the end of March, the crew took the occasion of a lull in the action as a photo op, resulting in the image above. Here’s Tyler’s commentary from that post:

 

“A few days ago we handed over guitars, a mandolin, a ukulele and harmonicas to the Iron Worker crew, and took this picture before work started with the crane. At least two of them play — can you guess which?”   

 

According to its website, the Old Town School of Folk Music is the largest community arts school in the nation. This new facility marks the first time the school has constructed a new building from the ground up. The structure is designed to be the primary site for the school’s loudest group classes (such as Irish step dancing) and will include three large dance studios equipped with sprung floors, 16 acoustically engineered classrooms, and a flex-use 2,100-sq.-ft, 150-seat convertible space that will act as a classroom, community area, dance hall and performance venue. Additionally, the large lobby will serve as a community gathering area.

 

To read more about the project, visit the school website and click on Expansion Project, then Construction News, or click here.

 

 


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