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Steel Shots: Replacing the Skagit River Bridge
Posted by Tasha Weiss on June 25, 2013 at 5:04 PM.

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Acrow Bridge has provided WSDOT with two 160-ft-long, 24-ft-wide temporary Interstate 5 bridge spans to replace the section that collapsed into the Skagit River in Washington last month. Designed for heavy interstate highway truck traffic, Acrow’s prefabricated modular steel bridges are quick and easy to customize and install. Photo: Courtesy of Acrow Bridge

 

Acrow Bridge (an AISC member), a bridge engineering and supply company, has provided the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) with two prefabricated modular steel bridges, which are being used side-by-side to replace the damaged section of the Interstate 5 bridge that collapsed into the Skagit River last month when it was struck by a truck with an oversized load.

 

The temporary spans will allow traffic to safely resume on the bridge while a permanent span is built. WSDOT reopened the Interstate 5 Skagit River Bridge last week.

 

“Prefabricated modular steel bridges are used all over the country to transport heavy traffic, as permanent structures or temporary detour bridges,” said Bill Killeen, president and CEO of Acrow Bridge. “Their design allows for fast customization, assembly and installation, which is critical in situations where safe passage and access need to be restored quickly.”

 

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) advocates the use of prefabricated modular systems because they offer significant time and cost savings, safety benefits, environmental advantages and convenience for travelers.

 

The two Acrow bridges that are being used on the Skagit River Bridge are each 160 ft long with roadway widths of 24 ft. The bridges are positioned next to each other to support four lanes of interstate highway traffic. Acrow is using some of its $30 million in inventory from its yards in Camas, Wash., and Lafayette, N.J., to supply these two bridges. Acrow’s offices in Camas and Vancouver, B.C., oversaw the temporary bridge span installation.

 

Specializing in prefabricated modular steel bridges, one area of Acrow’s business is to provide emergency infrastructure solutions across the U.S. and around the globe. Earlier this month, Acrow supplied bridge components used to support the Interstate 81 overpass bridge in Harrisburg, Pa., that was badly damaged in a tanker truck accident. The company’s modular solutions have replaced bridges lost to such catastrophes as Hurricanes Katrina, Irene and Sandy, the Chilean earthquake, Indian Ocean tsunami and Angolan Civil War and provided secure access for emergency workers and equipment at rescue and recovery sites, including Ground Zero at the World Trade Center in New York City.


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