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Steel Shots: Steel Work Complete at Whitney Museum
Posted by Tasha Weiss on March 1, 2013 at 5:39 PM.

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The steel silhouette of the future Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan, viewed from NYC’s High Line last December. Banker Steel Company (an AISC member/AISC certified fabricator) is the steel fabricator for the new 200,000-sq.-ft building, which will open to the public in 2015. Photo: Timothy Schenck

 

The new Whitney Museum of American Art, currently under construction near downtown Manhattan, reached a major milestone late last year: the final steel beam was installed on top of the nine-story structure.

 

whitneymuseum_topping-out-tree-copy.jpgDuring the topping out ceremony, Turner Construction employees (the general contractor) and Ironworkers Local 40 and city officials joined museum staff to celebrate the completion of the project’s steel framework. The building’s highest steel beam was signed and, following steel construction tradition, topped with an evergreen tree and an American flag before being hoisted to the top of the structure.

 

Banker Steel Company (an AISC member/AISC certified fabricator) is the steel fabricator for the new 200,000-sq.-ft building, and the architect is Renzo Piano.

 

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Situated between NYC’s High Line and the Hudson River, the new building will vastly increase the Whitney’s exhibition and programming space, providing the first comprehensive view of its unsurpassed collection of modern and contemporary American art. It will include approximately 50,000 sq. ft of galleries and 13,000 sq. ft of roof top exhibition space. It will also have stunning, unobstructed views to the west. (Rendering: Image courtesy of Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Cooper, Robertson & Partners)

 

You can keep up on the Whitney’s construction progress via a webcam on the project’s website that sends new images of the museum’s construction every 15 minutes. The website also features a regularly updated time-lapse video of the construction progress, as well as other informational videos about the project including one that documents the installation of a large, structural column that will support the future Whitney’s fifth floor — the largest column-free gallery space in Manhattan.

 

For more information about the project, visit http://whitney.org.


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