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Steel Shots: Accelerated Bridge Construction–Live!
Posted by Tasha Weiss on March 23, 2012 at 2:59 PM.

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A live webcam view, looking from Indiana to Kentucky, of the existing Milton-Madison Bridge (at left) and one of the new steel truss spans being assembled, on barges, for the replacement bridge. (OK, this shot is from yesterday; today’s weather isn’t being as cooperative for a clear image.) Photo: www.miltonmadisonbridge.com

 

A 600-ft, 1,700-ton steel truss span for the new Milton-Madison Bridge is rising above the shoreline in Milton, Ky. Workers are currently assembling the new truss bridge on barges just west of the existing bridge and, once complete, the span will be floated a short distance upstream for replacement of the existing bridge.

 

Special jacks will lift the entire section into place onto temporary piers that are being built just downstream of the existing bridge. A second, 727-ft section of span will also be built and “lifted” in a similar manner; the remainder of the truss will be erected on top of the piers using cranes.

 

By early 2013, the new Milton-Madison Bridge, spanning the Ohio River between Kentucky and Indiana, will be closed for just a few days while it is slid sideways from the temporary piers, upon which it is being constructed, onto rehabilitated and enlarged original piers, after serving as the traffic detour while the old bridge superstructure is being demolished.

 

The sliding technique allows the project to be built while minimizing disruption to traffic, accelerating construction and reducing costs considerably for a bridge of this scale. (The four steel truss spans measure 2,430 ft and weigh 15,260 tons in all!)

 

You can track the bridge’s construction progress in real time via a live webcam on the project website at www.miltonmadisonbridge.com/gallery/live
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(the above image is from the view of “Live Bridge Cam 2.”). All images are automatically archived for public viewing (with cool zoom features!) and you can also watch time-lapse videos. There you’ll also find the latest news and other information about the project.

 

You can learn more about the bridge’s innovative sliding technique in the February issue of MSC. The article, “Move That Bridge,” explains how the decision to use this system stemmed from its success on the Capilano River Bridge project in Vancouver, Canada.


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